Spaying and Neutering

Is spaying and neutering pets really necessary? After all, isn’t breeding a natural part of life? Actually, having your pet spayed or neutered is extremely important, not only for them, but for the pet population as a whole. There are millions of stray animals living on the streets and in shelters throughout the country due to overpopulation, which is the natural result of uninhibited breeding among dogs and cats. Spaying and neutering gives pets a chance to find a home and live out happy, healthy lives.

How Spaying and Neutering Keeps Pets Healthy

Pets can benefit in many ways from their spay and neuter surgeries, both from a health and behavioral standpoint.

Females

  • Will not become pregnant
  • Will not experience their heat cycle and spotting
  • Will be far less likely to roam in search of a breeding partner
  • Will not be at risk of developing ovarian or mammary tumors
  • Will not be at risk of developing pyometra, a severe uterine infection

Males

  • Will likely be less aggressive
  • Will be far less likely to roam in search of a breeding partner
  • Will be far less likely to spray or mark their territory
  • Will not be at risk of developing testicular tumors
  • Will not be at risk of developing an enlarged prostate

When to Spay and Neuter

Pets should be spayed and neutered at 5-7 months of age. Depending on your pet’s medical history and current health, this may vary, especially if they happen to have an illness or other health condition that needs to be treated first.

For females, it is ideal that they be spayed before they begin their first heat cycle. We will not perform surgery on pets that are in heat, as it could pose a higher safety risk.